tetw:

by Nick Paumgarten

People who feel they have smooth, manageable commutes tend to evangelize. Those who hate the commute think of it as a core affliction, like a chronic illness. Once you raise the subject, the testimonies pour out.

newyorker:

Sarah Anne Johnson created her series “Arctic Wonderland” after an artist’s residency on board a double-masted schooner in the Norwegian territory of the Arctic Circle, sailing from untouched landscapes to abandoned mining camps. “It seemed so pristine and perfect, vast and strong, but also somehow delicate and fleeting,” she says. “After such an experience, one can’t help speculating about the impact we have on this planet.” Upon her return, Johnson went to work on the photographs she’d taken with a full visual arsenal: paint, Photoshop, embossing, printmaking. “I do this to create a more honest image,” she says. “To show not just what I saw, but how I feel about what I saw.”

newyorker:

Sarah Anne Johnson created her series “Arctic Wonderland” after an artist’s residency on board a double-masted schooner in the Norwegian territory of the Arctic Circle, sailing from untouched landscapes to abandoned mining camps. “It seemed so pristine and perfect, vast and strong, but also somehow delicate and fleeting,” she says. “After such an experience, one can’t help speculating about the impact we have on this planet.” Upon her return, Johnson went to work on the photographs she’d taken with a full visual arsenal: paint, Photoshop, embossing, printmaking. “I do this to create a more honest image,” she says. “To show not just what I saw, but how I feel about what I saw.”

Marvin Miller transformed the Major League Baseball Players Association in the nineteen-seventies. Miller, a former labor negotiator for the United Steelworkers, would talk to the players about how unfair their contracts were and how much better things would be if they organized themselves. Visiting the San Francisco Giants at spring training one year, Miller predicted that if they could get rid of the system as they knew it then, the son of Giants right fielder Bobby Bonds would, if he made it to the major leagues, earn more in one year than Bobby earned in his career. Bobby Bonds’s son, Barry, ended up making more in one year than all of his father’s team made in their entire careers, combined.

Why top talent earns so much money : The New Yorker