This is What Happens When You Give Thousands of Stickers to Thousands of Kids

This December, in a surprisingly simple yet ridiculously amazing installation for the Queensland Gallery of Modern Ar, artist Yayoi Kusama constructed a large domestic environment, painting every wall, chair, table, piano, and household decoration a brilliant white, effectively serving as a giant white canvas. Over the course of two weeks, the museum’s smallest visitors were given thousands upon thousands of colored dot stickers and were invited to collaborate in the transformation of the space, turning the house into a vibrantly mottled explosion of color.

Like many as a child, the photographer Mark Meyer wondered what the difference between Yellow-Green and Green-Yellow was in that Crayola box of crayons. Using a monitor calibration tool and the Argyll 3rd party software he evaluated a box of 24 color box of Crayola crayons, and plotted them out with sRGB values. (via /.)

Like many as a child, the photographer Mark Meyer wondered what the difference between Yellow-Green and Green-Yellow was in that Crayola box of crayons. Using a monitor calibration tool and the Argyll 3rd party software he evaluated a box of 24 color box of Crayola crayons, and plotted them out with sRGB values. (via /.)

The vast majority of the world’s books, music, films, television and art, you will never see.

The reopening of the National Museum is intended not only for domestic consumption, but to project China’s cultural strength abroad. It is the tip of a museum construction boom. As of 2009 there were 3,020 museums in China, including 328 private museums (the American Association of Museums estimates 17,500 in the US). One hundred new museums are being added each year. Attendance to most historic museums has been free since 2008. In March the government made entry to museums of modern and contemporary art free. The torrid pace of museum development is part of a national drive to build cultural infrastructure and, as Cai Wu, the minister of culture, put it earlier this year in a published comment, “to establish a batch of world-famous cultural brands.”

“The next ten years should be a golden period for the development of every aspect of cultural industries in China,” said Ye Lang, of the Institute for Cultural Industries at Beijing’s Communications University, at a January conference.

newyorker:

Sarah Anne Johnson created her series “Arctic Wonderland” after an artist’s residency on board a double-masted schooner in the Norwegian territory of the Arctic Circle, sailing from untouched landscapes to abandoned mining camps. “It seemed so pristine and perfect, vast and strong, but also somehow delicate and fleeting,” she says. “After such an experience, one can’t help speculating about the impact we have on this planet.” Upon her return, Johnson went to work on the photographs she’d taken with a full visual arsenal: paint, Photoshop, embossing, printmaking. “I do this to create a more honest image,” she says. “To show not just what I saw, but how I feel about what I saw.”

newyorker:

Sarah Anne Johnson created her series “Arctic Wonderland” after an artist’s residency on board a double-masted schooner in the Norwegian territory of the Arctic Circle, sailing from untouched landscapes to abandoned mining camps. “It seemed so pristine and perfect, vast and strong, but also somehow delicate and fleeting,” she says. “After such an experience, one can’t help speculating about the impact we have on this planet.” Upon her return, Johnson went to work on the photographs she’d taken with a full visual arsenal: paint, Photoshop, embossing, printmaking. “I do this to create a more honest image,” she says. “To show not just what I saw, but how I feel about what I saw.”

If aliens landed today they’d think all we care about are sexy beers and fruity shampoos. I think our public spaces can better reflect what’s important to us as residents and as human beings.

— Candy Chang, in What Do You Want to Do Before You Die?

If Michaelangelo or Leonardo Da Vinci were alive today they’d be making Avatar, not painting a chapel. Film is incredibly democratic and accessible, it’s probably the best option if you actually want to change the world, not just re-decorate it.

Banksy (Yes, Banksy) on Thierry, EXIT Skepticism & Documentary Filmmaking as Punk

The postmodern mentality had turned the gallerygoer’s essential experience, which had once involved judging, into something closer to the take-it-or-leave-it experience of shopping … The real question, then as now, is how we choose. Our choices, although they can be idiosyncratic, must be fueled by pressures and preoccupations that have nothing in common with the choices we make when we decide whether to buy the black socks or the patterned socks—or end up buying both. Too often now, there seems to be something a little weightless about the interest in Jess or Hammersley or Remenick or Thek. To admire an artist for his own sake, although certainly a compliment, can also be a way of suggesting that he has no place in the larger scheme of things. When it comes to the development of a rigorous eclecticism, our freedom to choose is not so much a choice as it is a necessity. And the necessity of eclecticism must be grounded, deep down, in an idea about the unity of the arts, about the braided-togetherness of all experience.

Just Because An Artist Is Obscure Doesn’t Mean She’s Good. | The New Republic

"You live in the city and all the time there are signs telling you what to do and billboards trying to sell you something.

"And I always felt that it was all right to answer back a little bit, I suppose. That the city shouldn’t just be a one-way conversation

Banksy in his own words | The Sun |Features

In recent years, we have seen public service announcements by celebrities touting the benefits of arts education in elementary schools because it supposedly helps make better mathematicians or physicists out of children. Perhaps the point ought to be that arts education makes for better artists. Perhaps we ought to stop being so apologetic about art and not keep trying to wrap its trembling shoulders with that raggedy shawl of self-righteousness and instead advocate for public school funding that incorporates all aspects of education. Perhaps we ought to accept the fact that artists may produce work that is disinterested in social change, and put some of the burden back on the state to effect the kind of social change we want. Without buying too much into the neoliberal mantra of choice (often a code word for “choose this, or else”), we need to acknowledge that artists should have the power to choose when or if and how they will speak to social justice issues. Without that choice, they are only being exploited in the name of art or, worse still, in the name of art disguised as social justice. The privatization of the arts now mostly requires artists to speak explicitly to social justice, and that robs artists of any autonomy over their creative processes.

Make Art! Change the World! Starve!: The Fallacy of Art as Social Justice – Part I [Spring 2010] | Yasmin Nair

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