There are some things that trump safety and preparedness. Godspeed, New York!

There are some things that trump safety and preparedness. Godspeed, New York!

You get to the point where you evolve in your life where everything isn’t black and white, good and bad, and you try to do the right thing. You might not like that. You might be very cynical about that. Well, fuck it, I don’t care what you think. I’m trying to do the right thing. I’m tired of Republican-Democrat politics. They can take the job and shove it. I come from a blue-collar background. I’m trying to do the right thing, and that’s where I’m going with this.

— New York Senator Roy McDonald (R), Comes Out For Gay Marriage With Awesome Quote

Sure, people in Kansas City are nice. But I think there’s something about life in Kansas City, something about the pace, something about the ease of parking, something about the small market sports, something about the farming background, something about the opposing harshness of summer and winter, something that makes that good-hearted part of themselves come out. People in New York are nice too — many of the nicest people I know are New Yorkers — but in New York there isn’t often TIME to be nice. If you’re nice and let people in at the Holland Tunnel you will NEVER get where you’re going. In Kansas City, people have the time to be nice.

Joe Blogs: Home in Capital Letters

[O]nly 23 percent of students in New York City graduated ready for college or careers in 2009, not counting special-education students.

In the wealthier districts across the state, the news is better: 72 percent of students in “low need” districts are graduating ready for college or careers. But even that is well under the 95 percent of students in those districts who are now graduating.

The data also cast new doubt on the ability of charter schools to outperform their traditional school peers. Statewide, only 10 percent of students at charters graduated in 2009 at college-ready standards, though 49 percent received diplomas.

A follow-up (I think) to The Geotaggers’ World Atlas - this time comparing the differences in where tourists take pictures vs. locals. Seattle above, other cities here.

A follow-up (I think) to The Geotaggers’ World Atlas - this time comparing the differences in where tourists take pictures vs. locals. Seattle above, other cities here.


The Geotaggers’ World Atlas


The maps are ordered by the number of pictures taken in the central cluster of each one. This is a little unfair to aggressively polycentric cities like Tokyo and Los Angeles, which probably get lower placement than they really deserve because there are gaps where no one took any pictures. The central cluster of each map is not necessarily in the center of each image, because the image bounds are chosen to include as many geotagged locations as possible near the central cluster. All the maps are to the same scale, chosen to be just large enough for the central New York cluster to fit.

above: #24, Seattle, WA
See also:
New York
London
Paris
San Francisco
Berlin

The Geotaggers’ World Atlas

The maps are ordered by the number of pictures taken in the central cluster of each one. This is a little unfair to aggressively polycentric cities like Tokyo and Los Angeles, which probably get lower placement than they really deserve because there are gaps where no one took any pictures. The central cluster of each map is not necessarily in the center of each image, because the image bounds are chosen to include as many geotagged locations as possible near the central cluster. All the maps are to the same scale, chosen to be just large enough for the central New York cluster to fit.

above: #24, Seattle, WA

See also:

  1. New York
  2. London
  3. Paris
  4. San Francisco
  5. Berlin